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我院吴彦老师发表3篇英文期刊
日期:2020-03-30  发布人:  浏览量:{理论测试}

1.

Meili Niu & Yan Wu(通讯作者). Financing urban growth in China: A case study of Guangzhou[J]. Australian Journal of Social Issues (SSCI), 2019: 1-21.


TitleFinancing urban growth in China: A case study of Guangzhou

JournalAustralian Journal of Social Issues

AuthorsMeili Niu1, Yan Wu2.1 Center for Chinese Public Administration Research, School of Government, Sun Yat-sen University2 School of Public Management, South China Agricultural University

AbstractRapid urban growth has become a global phenomenon. As these city populations expand, urban governance is even more of a daunting challenge in many countries. China is not an exception. It is at once a transitional state still undergoing urbanization and economic development; it is also currently experiencing a slowing economy. China’s cities must simultaneously continue to improve the quality of urban life while maintaining social stability. Using the city of Guangzhou as an example of China’s mega-cities, this study explores the financing strategies used by Chinese cities to manage urban growth. While economic growth has always been the main priority, Guangzhou’s strategy has not followed China’s traditional approach of growth for growth’s sake; instead, it is relying on investment in innovation and transportation to promote the local economy. Education is also being stressed as a means of fostering human resources. However, undisciplined infrastructure financing and ineffective intergovernmental fiscal relations are jeopardizing the city’s fiscal sustainability. To correct this will require further reforms of China’s fiscal system and a careful sequencing of reforms to maintain a sustainable growth in the urban area.

KeywordsInfrastructure financing, public finance, sustainable development, urban growth

https://doi.org/10.1002/ajs4.87

Funding informationNational Social Science Fund of China, Local Government Debt Management System (19AZZ013); Department of Education of Guangdong Province (2018WQNCX007)



2.

Yong Fan, Yan Wu, Alfred M. Wu & Wei Wang, Decentralised Governance and County Empowerment: Evidence from China, Local Government Studies (SSCI). 2018445):670-696.


TitleDecentralised Governance and County Empowerment: Evidence from China

JournalLocal Government Studies

AuthorsYong Fan1, Yan Wu2, Alfred M. Wu3 & Wei Wang4.1 School of Taxation, Central University of Finance and Economics2 School of Public Administration, South China Agricultural University3 Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore4 School of Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University

AbstractDecentralised economic development initiatives empowering local governments have gained currency in both developed and developing contexts. The empowerment of county governments in China is a case in point. This study uses difference-in-differences (DID) and the fixed-effects model with panel data (1997–2008) in counties in Zhejiang Province to empirically investigate the different impacts of the empowerment reform on county economies and fiscal revenue (FR). The results reveal that the reform has not promoted county economies as expected but has significantly increased FR. The reform has had a larger impact on less developed counties than on developed ones, which suggests a positive outcome of this decentralisation policy in China with regard to revenue generation. This study on county empowerment in Zhejiang Province provides some policy implications for other regions in China or developing countries.

KeywordsDecentralisation; federalism; economic growth; local government; province-managing-county reform; empowerment; China



3.

Vyas, Lina, Mark Hayllar, and Yan Wu. Bridging the gap-contractor and bureaucrat conceptions of contract Management in Outsourcing. Public Organization Review 18.4 (2018): 413-439.


TitleBridging the gap-contractor and bureaucrat conceptions of contract Management in Outsourcing

JournalPublic Organization Review

AuthorsLina Vyas1, Mark Hayllar2 & Yan Wu3.1 School of Taxation, Central University of Finance and Economics2 School of Public Administration, South China Agricultural University3 Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy, National University of Singapore4 School of Public Policy and Management, Tsinghua University

AbstractPerceptions of bureaucrats and contractors and their contractual relationship underpin contracting success. They are important phenomena but have not been fully explored in the current contracting literature, particularly in a highly politicalized context, namely Hong Kong. Using the principal-agent theory and the transaction cost theory as the theoretical framework, this study examines the perceptions of the key stakeholders, conceptualizes five attributes of effective contract management, and offers recommendations on bridging their perceptions for success of contract administration in Hong Kong. The study helps readers comprehend the dynamics of contract management, and its implications of Hong Kong’s politicalized background.

KeywordsContract management; civil service training; stakeholder analysis; transaction cost theory; principal-agent theory; outsourcing



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